Glenn W. Ackerley
Glenn W. Ackerley
Partner at WeirFoulds LLP
(416) 947-5008
(416) 365-1876
66 Wellington St W, Suite 4100, Toronto-Dominion Ctr, Toronto, ON
Year called to bar: 1989 (ON)
Glenn Ackerley is Chair of the Construction Practice Group at WeirFoulds LLP. He represents clients from across the construction industry (including public and private owners, contractors, subtrades, suppliers, and consultants) in a wide variety of construction-related matters and project types. Glenn advises on project structures, construction and consultant contracts, procurement issues, and risk-avoidance strategies, often in the role of “project lawyer.” He litigates construction claims, including construction lien and trust claims, tendering disputes, and deficiency and delay claims, and is an experienced mediator and arbitrator. Glenn has taught various courses including the Ontario Association of Architects’ Admission Course and Ryerson University’s construction law course. In 2019, Glenn was the recipient of the Donald P. Giffin, Sr. Construction Industry Achievement Award, Toronto Construction Association and the Jock Tindale Memorial Award for Integrity in the Construction Industry, Ontario General Contractors Association. Glenn is a Member of the construction section of the ADR Institute of Ontario; past Chairman of the Board, Toronto Construction Association; past Board Member, Canadian Construction Association; and Fellow, Canadian College of Construction Lawyers.
Glenn W. Ackerley is a featured Leading Lawyer in:
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