R. Paul Steep
R. Paul Steep
(416) 601-7998
(416) 868-0673
66 Wellington St W, Suite 5300, TD Bank Twr, Toronto, ON
Year called to bar: 1982 (ON)
Paul Steep is a counsel in the firm’s Litigation group. Carries on a commercial litigation practice with specific focus on securities litigation, including class actions. Has an active trial and appeal practice and has been involved in corporate governance claims, business valuation disputes, oppression remedy claims, banking litigation, and securities and commercial contractual disputes before all levels of Ontario courts. Maintains a significant practice in the area of securities enforcement and related proceedings before the OSC and appears before other administrative tribunals, including the CPSO. Member of the American College of Trial Lawyers. Admitted to the Ontario Bar in 1982.
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